Panem Kitchen black eyed pea stew

In District Eleven, seeds and beans are often spirited away in any spare pockets, quietly tucked away when peacekeepers have their backs turned. When beans and scraps of vegetables unfit to be sent on to the Capitol are collected, a fine dish to make is this stew – so much the better if there is any sort of cured meat to add in.

Warm and filling, this stew is made more substantial by the use of black eyed peas, which expand while cooking and contain plenty of fiber to keep fieldhands feeling full. Covered, it will keep for a few days, and tastes better on the second (or even third) day.

By Aaron (admin) Published: August 10, 2013

  • Yield: 4 Bowls
  • Cook: 60 mins

In District Eleven, seeds and beans are often spirited away in any spare pockets, quietly tucked away when peacekeepers have their …

The Ingredients.
The Method.
  1. Soak the black eyed peas in water overnight, or at least six hours ahead of time. Discard any that float. Rinse the beans.
    Black Eyed Pea Stew
  2. Cook the bacon until a little under crispy and break into bite-sized pieces.
    Districyt 11 black eyed pea stew
  3. Dice onion, celery, and garlic fine, and saute in butter for five minutes, or until onions begin to become translucent. Add beans and four cups chicken broth, then stir in cooked bacon or salt pork. Season with plenty of black pepper.
    Diced onions
  4. Bring the whole mixture to a boil, stirring once or twice, then cover and leave it to simmer for half an hour to forty-five minutes. This allows the beans to soften and the liquid to reduce substantially.
    Panem Kitchen black eyed pea stew
  5. Although it can be eaten on its own, it is best served over cooked grain (rice is particularly delicious) with plenty of the cooking liquid in the bowl.
what people are saying.
  • via Reply

    this is amazing! every district has its own dishes. never knew that before ;) i’d like to prepare this sometime.. my father loves beans. i know he’ll love this too.

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